AUTUMN BRIDGE TAKASHI MATSUOKA PDF

Start your review of Autumn Bridge Write a review Shelves: The overthrow of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the Restoration of the Emperor, the abolition of the samurai class, the dissolution of the domains, the unprecedented intrusion of foreigners into Japan, the destruction of the last heroic proponents of bushido--all these events had occurred in the span of less than ten years. The radical late XIX century changes in Japan society offer a rich filon of inspiration for the epic canvas of Takashi Matsuoka. The main characters are the same, but there is a definite change of focus from the cinematic action and political infighting among the elite feudal lords of the Shogunate towards the intimate, the philosophical implications and the personal struggle of the actors to cope with a changing environment. In order to examine in detail the way the Bushido code of honor and the century spanning vendettas between the great houses affected the progress of the Nippon nation into the modern era, the author relies more heavily on the supernatural elements clairvoyance, communicating with the ghosts of ancestors that were only hinted at in the first book. The power of seeing the future, more of a curse than a blessing for the Okumichi lords of the Akaoka domain, allows not only an exploration of the Oriental principle of predestination, but also permits the novel to jump forward and backward in time, connecting the fate of the witch princess Shizuka from the 14th Century to the one of Lord Genji, the last Okumichi Lord during the fall of the Shogunate regime. Thus, it may be possible to read the second book before the first, but they work best together.

Author:Kajigrel Voodoobei
Country:Belize
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Travel
Published (Last):27 October 2016
Pages:377
PDF File Size:19.94 Mb
ePub File Size:12.56 Mb
ISBN:151-4-51557-171-1
Downloads:1628
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Voktilar



Start your review of Autumn Bridge Write a review Shelves: The overthrow of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the Restoration of the Emperor, the abolition of the samurai class, the dissolution of the domains, the unprecedented intrusion of foreigners into Japan, the destruction of the last heroic proponents of bushido--all these events had occurred in the span of less than ten years. The radical late XIX century changes in Japan society offer a rich filon of inspiration for the epic canvas of Takashi Matsuoka.

The main characters are the same, but there is a definite change of focus from the cinematic action and political infighting among the elite feudal lords of the Shogunate towards the intimate, the philosophical implications and the personal struggle of the actors to cope with a changing environment. In order to examine in detail the way the Bushido code of honor and the century spanning vendettas between the great houses affected the progress of the Nippon nation into the modern era, the author relies more heavily on the supernatural elements clairvoyance, communicating with the ghosts of ancestors that were only hinted at in the first book.

The power of seeing the future, more of a curse than a blessing for the Okumichi lords of the Akaoka domain, allows not only an exploration of the Oriental principle of predestination, but also permits the novel to jump forward and backward in time, connecting the fate of the witch princess Shizuka from the 14th Century to the one of Lord Genji, the last Okumichi Lord during the fall of the Shogunate regime.

Thus, it may be possible to read the second book before the first, but they work best together. I let more than a year pass between my lectures, and I struggled a bit in the beginning remembering the details of who was who and what they were fighting about, but eventually it came back, with the help of adequate references in the new text.

There are some very convincing female warriors in the epic: samurai and ninja fighting side by side with their lords, but I believe their importance in the later part of the story is more as a counterforce to the self destructive thirst for violence that has ravaged Japan throughout its medieval era. While Lady Shizuka and the American beautiful missionary Emily are interesting enough as principal characters, I found myself attracted more to the fate of the lesser ladies : Hanako, a lady in waiting in Genji household; Midori, a young girl given in marriage to a violent Okumichi lord at only 12 years of age; Lady Nowaki, the young unwed mother of Shizuka, and especially Kimi, a litle peasant girl near Mushindo Monastery that somehow ends up as the Abbess of the place and as a revered spiritual teacher.

The jumps around the timeline and the non-linear plot progression might have been a distraction and gimmicky way of creating tension in the absence of major action sequences, but they come together beautifully towards the end, giving the novel a much larger scope than if it were following only the Lord Genji point of view.

I was also less bothered by predestination and the visions of the future. I thought them unnecessary in the first book, as the historical events were interesting enough on their own, without recourse to the supernatural.

But this second volume would not function at all without it, and I have come to the conclusion that this belief in the absence of free will was major characteristic of the Japanese mentality at the times described. One way the author solves the puzzle of prophecy, is by making it as vague as possible and exploring the ways the receivers of auguri misinterpret the message and the way their efforts at escaping their fate leads them down the same path they are trying so hard to avoid: The foreseen always occurs in unforeseen ways.

Lord Genji In the end, there is always a choice, and the reason of the whole exercise of dwelling on the past is beautifully resumed by Mr. Like the earth itself, the heart had directions. Bitterness, anguish, fear, and hatred lay one way; equanimity, gratitude, kindness, and love another.

But the epic did come together beautifully towards the end, and I realized I learned more than I expected about the people that made history, rather than about the actual historical events which I cross c hecked on wikipedia. I wish there were more books written by Mr. Matsuoka, as I would be interested to read them too.

DAC808 DATASHEET PDF

Takashi Matsuoka

As she calmly awaits her fate, she begins to write, carefully setting down on a scroll the secret history of the Okumichi clan…of the gift of prophecy they share and the extraordinary destiny that awaits them. For six centuries, these remarkable writings lay hidden—until they are uncovered by an American woman, a missionary named Emily Gibson, who arrived in Edo harbor in , in flight from a tragic past. Soon an extraordinary man would enter her life: Lord Genji of the Okumichi clan, a nobleman with a gift of prophecy who must defend his embattled family—and confront forbidden feelings for an outsider in his midst. Emily, too, soon finds herself at a turning point; courted by two westerners, she knows her heart belongs to the one man she cannot have. As Emily sifts through the fragile scrolls, she begins to see threads of her own life woven into the ancient writings. And as past and present collide, a hidden history comes to life, and with it a secret prophecy that has been shrouded for centuries, and may now finally be revealed.

HARTILE PREVESTITOARE PDF

Autumn Bridge

Add to Cart About Autumn Bridge In the year , in the highest tower of Cloud of Sparrows Castle, a beautiful woman sits by the window, watching as enemies gather below and fires spread through the night. As she calmly awaits her fate, she begins to write, carefully setting down on a scroll the secret history of the Okumichi clan…of the gift of prophecy they share and the extraordinary destiny that awaits them. For six centuries, these remarkable writings lay hidden—until they are uncovered by an American woman, a missionary named Emily Gibson, who arrived in Edo harbor in , in flight from a tragic past. Soon an extraordinary man would enter her life: Lord Genji of the Okumichi clan, a nobleman with a gift of prophecy who must defend his embattled family—and confront forbidden feelings for an outsider in his midst. Emily, too, soon finds herself at a turning point; courted by two westerners, she knows her heart belongs to the one man she cannot have. As Emily sifts through the fragile scrolls, she begins to see threads of her own life woven into the ancient writings.

Related Articles